These Natural Infinity Pools Blow The Artificial Kind Out Of The Water

natural infinity pools

Flickr/Chris Ballance

Instagram is all about the infinity pool life these days. But the concept of finding swimming spots that look like the water extends for forever into the horizon predates the luxury industry by centuries. These natural infinity pools blow the artificial kind out of the water. Here’s where to find the best swimming spots around the world.

Gunlom Plunge Pool — Kakadu National Park, Australia

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This Aussie spot has both a waterfall and a natural infinity pool overlooking the national park below. You have to hike to get there, but the infrastructure is pretty good. There are showers and a barbecue for your post-swim park time.

Beaver Falls — Havasupai, Arizona, U.S.

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To get to Beaver Falls, you have to get a permit to Havasupai Falls (one of the most sought-after U.S. trails). It’s a 24-mile roundtrip journey and you have to camp onsite, but it’s otherworldly levels of beautiful.

Devil’s Pool — Victoria Falls, Zambia

Swimming in the Devil’s Pool is one of the most terrifying experiences we can imagine. Victoria Falls is one of the biggest waterfalls in the world and adventurers here dangle right over the edge.

Travertine Terraces — Pamukkale, Turkey

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Turkey’s most popular tourist site is the limestone hot springs of Pamukkale. In Roman days, people took baths in the mineral water. Travelers can still wade into the stunning tiers today.

Valley View Hot Springs — Villa Grove, Colorado, U.S.

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There are heated hot tubs and saunas onsite here, but we’re into the natural spring that overlooks the resort land. To keep things quiet, only a certain number of guests can visit at a time, so you have to book in advance. (P.S. It’s clothing optional.)

Porto Moniz — Madeira, Portugal

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It’s a little less natural these days, but the pools at Porto Moniz were formed by lava. Nowadays, there’s some development making the salt swimming pools accessible to all, but it’s still a seaside spectacle.

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